kh-e-p-r-i

wingthingaling:

The Most Beautiful Abandoned Railway Station in the World

This is an abandoned railway station in Abkhazia, former Russian territory. It stays untouched since the collapse of USSR – the railway connection of Abkhazia and Russia stopped and railway station left out of demand so nature could take over the left-overs of Soviet architecture.

Found on English Russia, photos by Ilya Varmalov

via MessyNessyChic

har3krishnarama
libutron:

Bobtail Squid 
This photo taken during a night dive at the Pier in Anilao, Batangas (Philippines), shows a bobtail squid striking a defensive pose.
Bobtail squids are cephalopods belonging to the Order Sepiolida, closely related to cuttlefish. They are small (2-8cm), with a short, rounded body, and without a cuttlebone. They have eight suckered arms and two tentacles.
These squids can only be positively identified by examining the arm and suckers of the males. Females are difficult to identify.
References: [1] - [2]
Photo credit: ©Todd Bretl

libutron:

Bobtail Squid 

This photo taken during a night dive at the Pier in Anilao, Batangas (Philippines), shows a bobtail squid striking a defensive pose.

Bobtail squids are cephalopods belonging to the Order Sepiolida, closely related to cuttlefish. They are small (2-8cm), with a short, rounded body, and without a cuttlebone. They have eight suckered arms and two tentacles.

These squids can only be positively identified by examining the arm and suckers of the males. Females are difficult to identify.

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: ©Todd Bretl

ancientart

ancientart:

The Bhaja Caves of Maharashtra, India.

Bhaja contains about 29 rock-cut caves, which date back to the 2nd century BCE, and is described by the Archaeological Survey of India to be “one of the important Buddhist centres of Hinayana faith in Maharashtra.” 

A prominent features of Bhaja is Cave 12, a chaitya-griha, pictured in the final photo, which is considered one of the earliest of its kind. The stupa at the back of the large apsidal hall was used for worship. Cave 20 contains a group of stupas, which were built in memory of deceased monks, and probably once contained their relics.

Cave 18 was a monastery, and its verandah contains two famous sculpted reliefs. One of these (pictured in the 2nd photo) is located to the left of the door. This artwork depicts a person riding an elephant (thought by some to be Indra) who carries an ankusa (elephant goad), with attendants aside the figure, carrying a banner. The second relief shows a royal personage aside two women. The royal figure (who some identify as Sun god Surya), rides a chariot driven by four horses, and appears to be trampling a demon-like figure.

Photos courtesy of & taken by Himanshu Sarpotdar. The write-up of the site done by the Archaeological Survey of India was of great reference to me when writing this post.